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TAG: Pitching

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Getting Started: Pitch Package, or Proof of Concept ?

TheFunded.com Discussion

Posted by Anonymous on 2010-01-02

Tags: Pitching Presentation

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Anyone Have Email List and Advice for How Best to Pitch Top Tech Columnists?

TheFunded.com Discussion

Posted by Anonymous on 2009-12-14

Tags: Pitching Email

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Things You Need to Have Ready to Pitch

TheFunded.com Discussion

Posted by Anonymous on 2009-11-08

Tags: Pitching Resources

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1
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Calacanis Expands Campaign Against Pitching Fees

TheFunded.com Discussion

Posted by Anonymous on 2009-10-09

Tags: Pitching Fees

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0
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Does Anyone Have Good Examples of "After the Fact" Pitch Decks

TheFunded.com Discussion

Posted by Anonymous on 2009-10-08

Tags: Pitching Resources Presentation

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Revolutionary Angels

TheFunded.com Discussion

Posted by Anonymous on 2009-10-01

Tags: Pitching Angels competition

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0
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Fees to Present to Funding Groups

TheFunded.com Discussion

Posted by Anonymous on 2009-09-22

Tags: Pitching Fees PCN

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0
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Would You List Tangential Competitors on Exec Summary Meant for Investors?

TheFunded.com Discussion

Posted by Anonymous on 2009-09-15

Tags: Pitching Executive Summary tengential competitors

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Dilemma in Fund Raising Planning

TheFunded.com Discussion

Posted by Anonymous on 2009-09-11

Tags: Funding Sources Crisis Introductions Pitching Fund Raising

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How to Respond to "What Do You Do"?

TheFunded.com Discussion

Posted by Anonymous on 2009-09-01

Tags: Pitching Experience Confidential Information

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Chasing My Own Tail

TheFunded.com Discussion

Posted by Anonymous on 2009-08-31

Tags: Pitching Fund Raising Angels VC

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3
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Example VC Pitch Deck with Explanations, Samples

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by KipMcC on 2009-08-26

Tags: Pitching Resources

PUBLIC:

Recently, I shared this outline & pitch deck example with the Capital Factory companies in Austin, Texas; you may find example slides, download the PPT template file, and read descriptions / discussion for each here:

http://kipmcc.wordpress.com/2009/08/0...

1. Title Slide

* The get everyone in the room and sitting down slide; Don’t roll forward from here until you have everyone in the room and paying attention if you can help it.

2. Agenda + Company Overview

* Make sure you’re covering what they want to cover; ask if you’re missing anything before launching into the pitch
* This is also the slide to give a quick summary of your company. This summary is important because it will give any other partners at the firm you talking to a “snap shot” of you’re company after you’re gone; it’s helpful for other partners in the firm to have at-a-glace info on what you do, in what market, company details, and so on.

3. Market + Market Context

* Why is your market interesting? Are there any compelling dynamics currently at play?
* How do you fit in? This can help set up your unique competitive advantage / “secret sauce” slide.

4. One-slide company overview: THE SLIDE

* In many cases, your entire pitch will be an interactive conversation while sitting on a single slide; this should be that slide.
* Done right, this allows you to describe what you do, who you do it for, why that’s important and your vision for the future.

5. Business Model; How we make money

* How, exactly, does your company make money? Do you have any examples of this working so far?
* Does any part of your business act as a “loss leader” for another, more valuable part?
* Do you have two models running simultaneously? is that good or bad & why? Make sure you clearly describe and delineate between them…and hopefully describe how they benefit and support each.

6. Progress, Mile stones, look into the future

* What you’ve accomplished so far?
* What you plan to do in the near future? In what timeframe?

7. Competition & your company’s “Secret Sauce”

* You relative to others in your space.
* The question that you must answer well: if your company is successful, how will you defend its business from competitors who see your success and want some or all of it for themselves? What can you do differently? What can you do uniquely and realistically for how long? What CAN’T (or is really really hard to) be duplicated? What is your special tech, model, process, team advantage or unique solution?

8. Current Partners, Customers & Pipeline

* Who are you working with today? Who will be your customer tomorrow?
* How, exactly, do you acquire customers? How much does it cost to acquire them? What is your average deal size? How could your business increase the average deal size? What is the average deal size of other companies in this same market? Does this information align with the Market Size / Market Context data from Slide #3 ? (hint: it should) Once you have a customer, can you sell them MORE stuff more easily? Why / why not / how much / when will you have it to sell? What is the expected life-time value of a customer (be careful to think about this relative to the cost to acquire a customer)?

9. Financial Details (revenue, expense, HC, projections)

* What is your current and future headcount (this equates to your burn rate as headcount is almost always the biggest expense)?
* what is your current monthly/quarterly burn rate and how does that ramp over time?
* what is your current revenue and how does that ramp over time?
* How quickly are you approaching a cash-flow breakeven point?
* What’s your revenue run-rate 12 months from now? What’s the net loss / gain over the same period?

10. Funding “ask” + use of proceeds (timing, other firms)
11. Team Overview
12. Thank you, questions, contact info (no example slide)

High-level guidelines:

* Create your own deck! Create a deck that allows you to tell your story according to your style; name the slides what you want; tell your story with text or pictures (within reason)

* Don’t leave out critical information! This outline is my suggestion of a “critical information” list; no rational investor will fund your company without knowing the information suggested by this outline.

* Proactively answer big-ticket questions! If there are obvious, elephant-in-the-room sort of questions regarding your business: address them before they get asked. This is always a better way to go.

* Be passionate and informed! Investors invest in the team – show them your passion and be sure to know data from adjacent or competitive markets, companies, and models.

* Finally, it’s really important to have enough white space in your presentation format. I like a white background because it prints and projects cleanly. I like titles that are single-line and as few words as possible; and I try to keep the text/image area “middle part” of the slide as open as possible. In general, right angles are easier to make look clean than circles but your mileage may vary. Less is more when it comes to the presentation template.

PRIVATE: Members Only

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Does Cold Email to VC Works?

TheFunded.com Discussion

Posted by Anonymous on 2009-08-24

Tags: Pitching Experience

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Experience in Funding Through Customer VC Arms?

TheFunded.com Discussion

Posted by Anonymous on 2009-08-24

Tags: Pitching Experience Approach

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WBT Showcase

TheFunded.com Discussion

Posted by Anonymous on 2009-08-22

Tags: Pitching Experience

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How to Get Into High Profile Demo Venues in the Valley?

TheFunded.com Discussion

Posted by Anonymous on 2009-08-21

Tags: Pitching Public Relations Valley

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Nortons Perfect Pitch Program

TheFunded.com Discussion

Posted by Anonymous on 2009-08-19

Tags: Pitching Experience Nortons Perfect Pitch Program

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Is Demo Pit in Tech Crunch 50 Worth $2,995

TheFunded.com Discussion

Posted by Anonymous on 2009-08-18

Tags: Pitching Public Relations

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Do You Leave Hard Copies of Your Slide Deck Post Pitch?

TheFunded.com Discussion

Posted by Anonymous on 2009-07-21

Tags: Pitching Materials

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Seeking VC Meeting: Cold Call vs. Introductions

TheFunded.com Discussion

Posted by Anonymous on 2009-07-13

Tags: Pitching Introductions

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Angel Investors Investor Material

TheFunded.com Discussion

Posted by Anonymous on 2009-07-12

Tags: Pitching Powerpoint Presenttion

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Lumira Capital?

TheFunded.com Discussion

Posted by Anonymous on 2009-07-10

Tags: Pitching VC

8
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Five Tips for Pitching

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by Mr. Smith on 2009-06-26

Tags: Pitching Strategy

PUBLIC:

Getting a meeting with an investor is hard these days, but it can be done. Once in a meeting, here are five strategies to make the meeting go well:

>> STICK TO THE FACTS
Sell your idea on factual information only. Avoid adjectives and superlatives whenever possible. You do not have the best, the most, or the greatest anything. Most investors see 2,500 deals per year. They need basic information to determine interest. Suspect information is a red flag, and it only takes one red flag for an investor to lose interest.

>> KEEP YOUR PITCH SHORT
You should be able to explain your company in 10 slides that take about 20 minutes to present. If you want to succeed, then videotape yourself giving the pitch. Watch the video and write down everything that you want to improve in a list. Repeat this process until you are happy with the results. At the end of your pitch, say: "does anyone have questions that I can help you with?" The shorter your pitch, the more questions that will you have, and more questions are good.

>> ANSWER EVERY QUESTION BRIEFLY
Answer every question with one or two sentences and with as few words as possible. Uncomfortable silence is a tool that you can use to elicit another question. If you do not have or know an answer, say: "I don't recall the answer to that off the top of my head, can I look it up in my files and get back to you through email." Questions are an excellent sign of interest and engagement. When an investor gets into 'question mode,' they usually have a series of 5 to 10 questions that they need answered quickly to evaluate the opportunity. You are doing well in a pitch when the investors are talking.

>> ASK FOR FEEDBACK AND TAKE NOTES
Make sure to leave a few minutes to collect feedback. Ask the investors, 'do you have any recommendations for the business?' Have a pen and paper out, and write down everything that the investors say. It's a common courtesy to take notes, and it is expected. After an investor says something, say 'thank you.' Do not get defensive. Nothing sours a relationship faster than getting into a debate.

>> BE AN EXPERT IN YOUR INDUSTRY
You should read every recent blog post and know about every key development in the primary industry and all related industries to your idea. It is very likely that an investor will have seen and researched a very similar idea within the last 45 days. It is also very likely that this investor will ask you about mundane developments or other companies in the field as a test of your knowledge and to show off their own expertise. When confronted, you say, 'Yes, I was aware of that. Thank you.' This will lead to more questions.

As a closing point, be confident and assured. A common misperception is that a deal can be done in one meeting. It usually can't. So, the goal of any meeting should be (1) to get another meeting and (2) to specify follow-up items.

Do members have some other suggestions to add in the feedback?

PRIVATE: Members Only

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How Much Information to Share with VC Before the Meeting

TheFunded.com Discussion

Posted by Anonymous on 2009-06-24

Tags: Pitching Disclosure

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Fair Valuation and Reasonable Sales forecasts

TheFunded.com Discussion

Posted by Anonymous on 2009-06-22

Tags: Pitching Valuation